Friday, July 8, 2016

Meet microSD's successor, Samsung's UFS memory cards

Samsung UFS Chips
IMAGE: Samsung
In this generation and day, fast and portable storage is almost considered a basic necessity. We are used to clicking a movie and it loading within seconds, taking hundreds of burst mode photos on our smartphone or camera, and even take 4K videos. Our storage options right now are pretty darn fast and we are not likely to experience a delay – no matter what we do. But, it is the twenty-first century and everyone wants advanced technology and faster accessibility at their fingertips. And as always, Samsung again has shown its commitment to advance the technology.

The tech-giant has taken memory cards to the next level by announcing the removable UFS cards. For all the non-geeks out there, UFS stands for Universal Flash Storage. This is the same type of storage that is used as the built-in storage for many smartphones these days, such as the Samsung Galaxy S6 and the S7. Samsung says that these UFS cards will have reading speeds five times faster than the best microSD cards currently in market. Allegedly, it has a reading speed of 530 megabytes per second, which is REALLY fast. As far as the write speeds go, it will have rate of up to 170 MB/s, which quite higher than the UHS-3 microSD cards currently in market.

Is there a need for such technology currently? I am going to say no. But, it doesn’t hurt to know that there is some technological advancement occurring. Since Samsung has started this new trend, many other brands such as SanDisk might even join the bandwagon. Also, as there is a slow transition to the 4K and virtual reality world, the removable UFS cards might come in handy with the future higher resolution 360-videos. However, these cards are not supported by any of the device currently on market. They might be the same size as a microSD card, but the actual chip configuration is very different from that of the microSD cards. Yet I doubt that this will be a problem since Samsung will probably enable their support for the chip in future cameras and smartphones – probably even the upcoming Galaxy Note 7.

[Source: Samsung]